Brazil

'Robin Hood' Criminal Groups: Providing for the Community when the Government Cannot

November 7, 2018

Conventional perceptions of Latin America’s organized criminal groups tend to emphasize the greed and violence produced by these groups when, in reality, their existence is much more nuanced than this. Although most associate the presence of criminal groups with heightened levels of violence or drug use, these groups usually do much more than this, often providing certain services and resources to local communities.

Coffee rust disease posed to destroy Latin American market (and your daily coffee fix)

October 29, 2018

Since the introduction of coffee as a staple in morning routines worldwide, it has become one of the most traded commodities on the planet; in fact, it was second only to oil this year (teleSUR 2018).  The sudden demand for coffee helped to launch Latin America into the industrial age, with countries like Brazil and Costa Rica (which now leads world coffee production at around 45 million 60 kilogram bags per year) setting prices and international standards for the industry.

Latinos struggling to find voice in fashion industry

September 27, 2018

For years, global fashion has looked overwhelmingly Western.  Prominent displays of the world’s top designers have been showcased around the globe; or rather, they have graced runways in New York, Paris, Milan or London.  Some of the most celebrated companies in fashion like Kering and LVMH are based in the United States or Europe. With few exceptions, high fashion has been created in Western countries and reserved for consumers within those geographical constraints.

Fire in Rio Museum Highlights the Consequences of Lack of Government Funding

September 10, 2018

This past Sunday, September 2nd, 2018, a fire broke out in Rio de Janeiro’s National Museum of Brazil. The fire was devastating, almost entirely destroying the historic building and thousands of national and international artifacts. The building itself, which began construction in 1803 was known as Paço de São Cristóvão, and was once home to the Portuguese Royal Family. After Brazil’s independence in 1822, it became the palace of the Brazilian Emperor.

Queer Museum Brings Uncomfortable Truth About LGBT+ Expression in Brazil

September 3, 2018

Brazil, like other Latin American countries, is multifaceted when it comes to LGBT+ rights. As a country bursting with art and culture it provides unique opportunities to showcase queer identity through art and celebrate the pride of the community. São Paulo hosts the largest gay pride parade in the world, and the Ipanema neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro is known for being a popular gay destination.

The Fight to Decriminalize Abortion in Brazil

August 7, 2018

Debora Diniz is widely known in her homeland of Brazil as an activist, anthropologist, writer, filmmaker, law professor, and a co-founder of ANIS: Institute of Bioethics, an organization dedicated to bioethics and human rights in Latin America. In addition to her impressive career as a professor and lawyer, Diniz has worked on Brazilian Supreme Court cases involving abortion, marriage equality, the secular state, and stem cell research.

Bribery Cartels: Civil Society Leaders and Collusive Corruption in Bolivian Street Markets

July 6, 2018

Bribery cartels between officials and local leaders hide corruption. Bribery cartels operate around the world: della Porta and Vannucci (1999) document cartels of businesspeople and politicians in Italy who collude to keep influence and money circulating between cartel members. Ufere et al. (2012) and Fisman and Gatti (2002) found similar collusion in Nigeria and Indonesia’s business sectors. In 2015, investigators uncovered bribery arrangements between FIFA representatives and officials from dozens of countries that featured cartel-like behavior.

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