women

A Woman's Place

March 23, 2017

On March 8, 2017 most of the world celebrated International Women’s day. And while this celebration has seldom existed without controversy, this year the internet exploded as social media watched and compared two very distinct speeches from world leaders.[1]

Michelle Bachelet Takes a Stand for Women's Rights in Chile

October 12, 2016

After three years of the heading the organization, UN Women, which strives for international gender equality and empowerment of women, Michelle Bachelet returned to her seat as president of Chile. This is her second term in office and she is focusing especially hard on equality for women. As the leader of UN Women, Bachelet and other diplomats, worked on the 58th session of the Commission of the Status of Women to stake out five of the most important women’s equality agreements to improve on in international law.

Women, Machismo, and Politics in Latin America

October 5, 2016

In her first presidential speech in 2005, Michelle Bachelet remarked, “Who would have said…15 years ago that a woman would be elected president?”1 Yet many countries, such as the United States, have not been able to celebrate the election of a woman as head-of-state. Worldwide, representation of women in politics remains low: as of January 2015, only 22 percent of all national legislators were women.

The Color of Hunger

September 24, 2016

     The porous 2,219 km land border between Colombia and Venezuela was closed in August of 2015, by order of the Venezuelan president Nicolás Maduro, as part of a campaign against smuggling and alleged paramilitaries operating in the area.  Since then, hundreds of Colombian citizens living on the Venezuelan side of the border have been expelled and several thousand returned on their own with fear of deportation.

Where the Women Lead

October 10, 2016

If Bill Clinton had been president of a Latin American country, then it would be statistically probable that Hillary Clinton––a Yale educated lawyer, former U.S. Senator, and former U.S. Secretary of State––would have been elected president by now. Some may think this a bold supposition, but it is a supposition rich in historical precedent.

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