Afro-Indigeneity

Central American and Caribbean Dance: Tracing African Roots

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By Ashley Brown

The Garifuna sing their pain. They sing about their concerns. They sing about what's going on. We dance when there is a death. It's a tradition [meant] to bring a little joy to the family, but every song has a different meaning. Different words. The Garifuna does not sing about love. The Garifuna sings about things that reach your heart (Serrano, 2018).

Afro-Indigeneity in Latin America: Conversations of Diasporic Blackness, Allyship, & Advocacy

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By Ashley Brown

With the coming and passing of Indigenous Peoples' Day, we are tasked with continuing the celebration and advocacy for Indigenous communities that have been destroyed and deeply scarred by centuries of colonization. The diversity of identities in Latin America has resulted in the creation of new cultures, languages, and world perspectives. Two groups that embody this intersectionality are the Afro-Indigenous tribes known as the Garifuna and the Miskito people. Both communities are challenged with efforts to erasure their culture However, the growing recognition and representation of Indigenous people help combat this cycle of violence from continuing.

How can our intentional consumption of knowledge and advocacy challenge the colonial paradigms that marginalize Afro-Indigenous communities?

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